Category
Photography, Art
 FREE FOR ALL
 theme and variation on the flag during the U.S. Bicentennial

 exhibition elements










supplemental






image CD on request

text boards
one
two
three
four

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other exhibits

Russian Hill

Rio Arriba

Libido Beach


Inquiries invited

210 ft  (est)
+ video area
  
11k+: 1-8-wks

10; 200 lbs (est)
included in fee
to be provided


Robinson Joyce

 510-549-2461
 literary@att.net



Patriotism is personal, creating expressive sparklers. One photographer captured them during the U.S. Bicentennial. Widely published then, these photographs, collectively and in counterpoint, individualize our approach to the flag, create a standard of design, and take many rigid associations for an imaginative ride. Even now, the flag is always with us, even when we don't see it. It's suggested in a hundred different ways daily. It's part of our landscape. History simply doesn't go away; it insists on itself; it seeds the ground, it scents the air, it becomes part of our language. As the 21st Century begins to define itself, these photographs deserve a continuing place both in the archives of our time and in the lights of our consciousness.

Theme and variation on the flag -- images which say flag when there is none in the picture, along-side images containing the flag in an unexpected light -- set in a historical context, for continuity and contrast -- offer excellent exhibit possibilities. The photographer and his imagery both have an interesting and establishing history. Indeed the photographs appeared in Esquire and Communication Arts, and in animated form on Showtime, French, Polish and Irish National Television. The photographer, Elihu Blotnick, is also a recognized poet, available for public speaking.

© 2016 firefallmedia, all rights reserved.



Category
Photography, Art
SEEDLINGS the Canyon Kids:
growing up in a nature preserve,
a romance of the redwoods,
portrait of a 2-room schoolhouse
exhibition elements










supplemental





(image CD with slide script on request)

text boards
title pdf
intro pdf
ground-state pdf


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books
guides
publicity
lectures


requirements


costume
alphabet
mother injury
dress-up
school-visit
to-school graduation
size

participation

crates; weight
shipping/insurance
checklist

reservations


 


other exhibits
glimmins
baby faces
world windows

Inquiries invited

75-110 ft  (est)

7k+: 1-8 wks

6; 30 lbs each
included in fee
to be provided


Robinson Joyce

 510-549-2461
 literary@att.net


"Two-room schools are as rare as white bluejays. Canyon has both. The jay bullies the smaller songbirds, for first pick at the lunch crumbs on the rear porch. In turn the screams, of the running children at recess, chase the jay up through the branches. The school itself stands still in time, it seems. Built in 1918, its dark walls milled from fallen trees at the bottom of the canyon, the school blends into the redwood forest.
     "Redwoods need little care. Children need much, but the woods are relatively safe and forgiving. With 250 people in 56 houses scattered on the hillsides, it’s hard to get lost. Following the stream or the slope of the land always leads somewhere. Keeping up with the world outside requires more constant attention.
     "Uniquely isolated, 26 miles from downtown San Francisco, Canyon is the last rural community within this urban center, but life in the redwood canyon is diverse, changing. Indeed Canyon is a microcosm of the world around it.
     "Still there’s the difference: redwoods dwarf most anxieties, the forest enchants with its peace, nature creates slowly, it sets people apart, lets each be more himself. Of course canyons are also teacups: porcelain gossip surrounds everyone, the brittle chatter is always there. The seasons have special influence though. They bind everyone — artists and farmers, the inheritors and the disinherited, engineers and tree-toppers, the upwardly mobile and the poor — in common preoccupation.
     "The school does also. It roots the community. By law, people can’t live here without the school. Canyon is a designated watershed, but educational structures have precedence. Otherwise the community could be forced from the woods by the water company.
     "Now though hawks glide above the houses. A white jay plays in the stream bed. An alphabet block divides the shallow water. A pencil snaps off in a tree. Melika’s learning to read her kindergarten diploma.
     "Nature grows children slowly. Redwoods teach too. We’ve emancipated ourselves from the garden of magic.
     "Always it exists here. Still, time never stops, only the photograph.
     "The goal I set for my camera, from the beginning, was to capture the spark of childhood in the forest darkness, to discover the fullness of community, and to make learning visible, and so tell the story of the smallest, nearest wilderness town and its survival. In Canyon, the school remains as the well of community. Indeed the children draw on their sense of place, they learn to teach themselves, they become Canyon Kids, they are encouraged to stand with the trees. It happens to outsiders too, to those who look in. This then is the way it’s been, for those who are there. Through these pictures the memory is shared.
     "Exploring always leads to the unexpected. Sometimes its at your front door. In fact Canyon is a short ride from San Francisco, into a different world. Here the road weaves in gentle curves, following the creek, into the heart of a redwood grove. Here a two-room schoolhouse lives. I knew at once that its pulse could be taken in pictures. I used a Nikon FTN, with 35 and 85mm Nikkor lenses, and Kodak Tri-X and Plus-X films during the years 1970-1990."

Elihu Blotnick


Category
Photography, Art, poetry
SALTWATER FLATS 
a personal journey in images and poems
exhibition elements






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text boards
(image CD with slide script on request)


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crates; weight
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other exhibits
the 60s
  the comix
California St.

Inquiries invited

75 ft  (est)

9k+: 1-8 wks

6; 25 lbs each
included in fee
to be provided

Robinson Joyce

 510-549-2461
 literary@att.net


The 52 silver gelatin prints from which Elihu Blotnick's first book SALTWATER FLATS was produced. The images are to size, but their impact is large.  The New York Times wrote about them in 1975: "Profound and very personal images of contemporary America"

     "Where were you last night?
     What shadows did you take
      to get home? The paved eye
      to your door was closed when
      I got there. Did you dream
      your sleep? I live half-way

      "between here and sunrise.
      The tide is green to the east.
      The swallow drinks on the wing.
      The frog leashed to my doorstep
      warns me of searchers
      scaring the orchids

      "shut. Eyes are what they
      see. Who blessed the weed?
      ...."

      Elihu Blotnick



Category
Photography, Art, literature
Winter Faces - German Speaking People
Reunification - Central European Time
exhibition elements





supplemental





text boards
(image CD with slide script on request)

resume


books
guides
publicity
lectures


requirements







size

participation

crates; weight
shipping/ insurance
checklist

reservations


 





80 ft  (est)

5k+: 1-8 wks

6; 25 lbs each
included in fee
to be provided

Robinson Joyce

 510-549-2461
 literary@att.net


This exhibit consists of forty-four silver gelatin prints by Elihu Blotnick, first shown at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism in 2005.

"Reunification happened officially in 1990. I brought a 1936 Leica to see it. My idea was to show the new Germany to itself, reflected in its own chrome-rimmed eyes. As a foreigner though, I used Kodak's T-Max 3200 and shot from the hip, American style, unobtrusively, quietly, in motion. By developing the film with infinite care (soaking it overnight in the refrigerator), and thus keeping the grain to a minimum, I was able to render in full-tones the blindering cold.
     "Life is climate. North Sea storms blow themselves out across the German visage. The grim resentful purpose and the sour public grin seen on so many faces suggest that, in this dark damp world, vision too is ever-dim and limited.
     "A lens sees everything however. And film freezes the results still further. The 28mm lens I used now offers second sight. It's wide enough to catch surprises. It renders side by side comparisons, for later study. It defines the multiple foci of the city, with ease.
     "The purpose I set for myself from the beginning was to document the changes as the ordinary individual encountered them; not the media reality but the daily immediacy. I didn't run after events but came to them in advance to see what the aware individual saw in the normal course of his life.
     "Like most everyone else, I lived an ordinary existence, but among students, with the idea that they will define the future. And I traveled as chance allowed, to Austria, Italy, and different parts of East and West Germany, through the winter and into the summer.
     "What people pay most attention to of course is each other; what they see are the possibilities among themselves. Shopping and touring opportunities seemed the chief concern in fact in all areas of the country.
     "Sometimes, in my effort to go unnoticed, I shot with my back to the subject. But my Leica's been polished to a high brilliance from constant rubbing against my cotton shirt. The camera is so small and light I could almost forget it's there, but I never did. There was always a scene in front of me to record. What follows are some that were offered, that offered themselves.
     "In this deeply conservative land, change is slow and subtle. Instantly everything new is old again."

     Elihu Blotnick


Category
Photography, Art
GLIMMINS
Children of the Western Woods,
Looking Up
exhibition elements









supplemental





(image CD with slide script on request)

title board
intro board
captions

resume


books
guides
publicity
lectures


requirements




size

participation

crates; weight
shipping/insurance
checklist

reservations


 


other exhibits
polemical films
baby faces
world windows

Inquiries invited

75-110 ft  (est)

7k+: 1-8 wks

6; 30 lbs each
included in fee
to be provided


Robinson Joyce

 510-549-2461
 literary@att.net


A story-show in 250 words and 60 photographs, captioned, introducing and defining the Glimmins: woods-children in search of themselves, spirited rascals looking up. The definition evolves with the book. At first a Glimmin is a boy who can cross his eyes. Soon it’s the demon of personality in all children.

"In ten years of photographing the children of California I’ve succeeded in at least one classic set of photographs: a sequence at a two-room school of the children posing freely for their end-of-the-year picture. It’s been taken as a metaphor for both the disintegration of civilization and joyous release. The photographs have been widely published and exhibited. Now, visiting similar environments, I’ve tried to create a clearly positive statement by photographing the children in all their pride, undaunted, before the rules of posing overwhelm more natural postures.The original title of this effort was LOOKING UP. The tilt of the children make the viewer feel ten feet tall. That seemed enough. But then the images began to speak, say things that made sense to each other and suddenly the Gglimmins happened. “Children of the Western Woods” remains the sub-title. (All the children in fact are from two-room school-houses in northern California. They share the same spirit and story."  EB

Elihu Blotnick

© 2016 firefallmedia, all rights reserved.